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Here’s episode 6. It took me a couple of weeks to get around to posting it, but here it is. My #FiatFriday videos and other Go.Do videos will be slowing down in releases for the summer. It’s just because I’m doing stuff, ya know? And there’s something really big and exciting happening in our family… which you will hear about in due time. How’s that for suspension?

In this vlog I talk about:

In this episode, we go to the Fresno Chafee Zoo with 3 other families and we are completely outnumbered. Have you ever tried to herd 14 kids through a zoo? It’s a little crazy. Josiah’s favorite part was Sting-Ray Bay. It’s awesome because you can pet the sting-rays and some sharks too! We’ll be back next week, since we bought a family pass, to shoot a video for a school project. Enjoy and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel for more regular updates.

In this episode, Josiah and I explore Woodward Park in Fresno, Ca. It cost us $5 to drive in, but you can always park across the street and walk, run or bike into the park itself. Subscribe to our channel and see more Go.Do videos!

Your local public park can be a great source of adventure. Most people take their kids and sit on a bench while their kids play. They (we… I’m guilty too) use the time to catch up on email or Facebook. But what if we helped their imagination bloom? What if we became part of their games? What if we participated with them? We’re making these YouTube videos to encourage people to play together and Go Do Something. Life is actually pretty amazing and my kids are growing up fast, so I’m trying to be more proactive in enjoying each day with them. Sometimes it’s little and simple and sometimes it’ll be bigger, but it’s something.

What kinds of things do you do with your kids to create memories together?

 

 

In our second episode on Go.Do, our new YouTube channel, we go to a brand new pet store in Fresno called Lost Realms Pets. It’s awesome and you should go! Check it out:

Tripp and Tyler are at it again. Here’s their follow up to A Conference Call in Real Life. If you work from home or have a virtual job, you know #TheStruggleIsReal.

autumn moments

Yesterday I got a screen shot in the form of a text message from Chris Loach, a good friend and one of our volunteer staff at Two Cities Church. It was an email sent from… me. Only it wasn’t from me and I immediately thought, “OH NO! I’VE BEEN HACKED! WHO ELSE IS GETTING THESE?!!!” I’m sure you can relate to those kinds of panic moments. I haven’t had a hacking situation like this since MySpace was a real social media option. Here’s a screenshot of the email Chris received.

email1

After a few minutes of digging around, I realized I wasn’t hacked, I was Spoofed.

There’s different kinds of spoofing attacks, but mine was fairly simple and just about anyone can do it explains askleo.com. My spoofer simply sent an email from what looked like me, but when you press reply, it showed his real address. He or she was not using a very complicated method. However, sometimes they’re a bit more complicated as lifehacker.com explains. So what did I do about it? The following is how I seem to have spooked my spoofer from spoofing me again.

5 Steps to Spooking your Spoofer

Step 1: Know When it Hits
In order to go from spoofed to spooker, you’ve got to know when it happens and you need to know fast because the chances are, they’re not stopping with one email. That means you need your contacts not to just delete the email, but to actually inform you that it happened, like my buddy Chris did for me. (Thanks man!) Once you know, you need to take immediate action to avoid fall out from your contacts.

Step 2: Hit Reply
I asked Chris to click on the name and make sure it says my email. He did and it did. Then I said, “I wonder what would happen if you hit reply” and boom. There it was, the real email that the spoofer was spoofing from.

IMG_6790 email 3

Step 3: Research
Once I had the real email this person was sending from, I went on a hunt for information about that person and that email. First stop, google.com. Google had nothing to say about that email address. No social media accounts. No other usages in forums. No previous articles, websites or blog posts mentioning the email (ceomanagement9@gmail.com). So I decided to figure out what I could about the user via the gmail account recovery process. I went to gmail.com and plugged in the address, then I clicked on “forgot my password” and chose the text me option. In order to actually get the password you’d need a lot more information, but I wasn’t trying to hack them. I was trying to get information about them. It revealed that their phone number associated with their account is **********77. Here’s what that tells me, their number ends in 77 and it’s one digit too long to be a number from the USA. So they are international.

Step 4: Invite Them to a GoogleTalk Video Chat
I invited them to a video chat. Imagine, what if they had actually accepted my invitation and I could video chat with this person? Wouldn’t that be shockingly amazing?! But they didn’t. But I’m sure that’s when they started getting a little spooked.

Step 5: Email Them and Block Them
I sent two emails to the address and explained that their attempts to scam my contacts would not work. They’re much too smart. People doing these kinds of scams are looking for low-hanging fruit, people who are frazzled by emergencies and many of whom are elderly. As soon as they realize they aren’t going to profit from scamming you or your friends, they’ll move on. In the email I sent, the point was not to make them angry, it was to scare them…hopefully enough to abandon or close the email they used completely and or out of the business. I’m hoping by the end of the time that they realized someone tried to log in to their real email, the person they were spoofing tried to video chat them and they were found out that they were spooked.

Bonus Step: Don’t Get Spoofed Again
I am the administrator of our church domain, twocitieschurch.com, and so I have the ability to go into the admin console and block them from emailing anyone within the organization. I took great pleasure in that step.

Here’s the deal, you can’t stop people from being dumb and trying to scam you, but you can make it difficult for them and you can spook them. So let’s make it difficult for the spoofers who are trying to take money from your contacts. Have you ever been hacked, spoofed or scammed? What was your experience and how did you deal with it?

Tripp & Tyler are at it again. They’ve brought you some of the best comedy-shorts/commercials that YouTube has to offer. You may recognize their work with Email in Real Life and A Conference Call in Real Life. Here you have it… their latest comedy-short/commercial, Poo-Poo Parents Say. I definitely relate to this one. I say most of these things, multiple times a day and if you have little kids, you probably do as well.

Enjoy.

apple-watch

Apple Inc. and almost every other major consumer electronics company are sued on a regular basis. If there’s ever a good reason to register your purchases, it’s those lawsuits. When companies like Apple are sued and you’ve registered the product they’re sued over, you may be eligible for some kind of payout and in fact, they’ll just send your cut to you without you having to do anything. But here’s the problem. You’ve probably moved since that purchase and you didn’t update your mailing address and your forwarding address has long expired.

What happens to your cut then?

If you live in the USA, it gets sent to your state controller. This doesn’t just happen with lawsuits and payouts. This happens when you have any amount of money in any account. Those .15 cents you didn’t care to cash out when you closed that bank account online. Those $40 rebates from Comcast and that $29.98 check Microsoft tried to send you for your mail-in rebate from 2002. Even mineral rights for loved-ones and life insurance you didn’t know your great-grandpa had. It’s all being held by the state controller.

So how do you get your cut?

They aren’t searching you out. You have to search it out. I wrote a blog post describing that, complete with links, here: Unclaimed Property.

The reactions I got from that post varied greatly with mostly skepticism. So I decided to write a blog post after I got my money and what I did with it.

I had 3 outstanding claims of which I have received 2 checks totaling $399. As soon as I got the checks, I deposited them and the next day I went down to the Apple Store and used that Apple money and bought myself a 42mm Black Apple Watch, sport edition. It feels good to buy Apple products with money Apple ows you. I have no idea the reason they owed it to me and I assume it had to do with some lawsuit about the early iPod that I bought, but I really don’t have a clue. But I’m happy to use it on their products.

The proof is in the pictures, right? Well here’s my proof.

check 1

check 2

And here’s my watch on my wrist.

Photo Jul 03, 4 50 06 PM

So tell me. Have you found any money held by the state controller? If so, what do you plan to do with it?